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Q. What Can Homeopathy Treat?

A. People often ask if homoeopathy makes a difference for asthma, diabetes, ulcerative colitis, multiple sclerosis, emphysema, glaucoma, Parkinson’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis… or any one of a hundred other diseases. The answer is both yes… and no.

Homeopathy works best when given for the symptom complex of an individual, not for a diagnosis given to many.

This is because we don’t just suffer from isolated and disconnected diseases – everything about our health is interconnected. For example, a problem with our heart may be affected by anxiety which is then related to a skin problem or even a stomach disorder.

In this illustration, the homeopath would not see the possible heart failure, eczema, gastric ulcer, and panic attacks as complaints to be managed separately but parts of a larger dis-ease represented by it’s combined symptom complex – and a matching homeopathic remedy would be chosen for the idiosyncratic symptoms of this complex.

When the full extent of the body’s dis-ease is reflected back to it in this way, a healing response is triggered in which many symptoms resolve at the same time; while the remedy is the stimuli, the body’s response to it creates the healing.

Migraine

Migraine is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent moderate to severe headaches often in association with a number of autonomic nervous system symptoms. The word derives from the Greek ἡμικρανία (hemikrania), “pain on one side of the head”, from ἡμι- (hemi-), “half”, and κρανίον (kranion), “skull”.

Typically the headache affects one half of the head, is pulsating in nature, and lasting from 2 to 72 hours. Associated symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light, sound, or smell. The pain is generally made worse by physical activity. Up to one-third of people with migraine headaches perceive an aura: a transient visual, sensory, language, or motor disturbance which signals that the headache will soon occur. Occasionally an aura can occur with little or no headache following it.

Migraines are believed to be due to a mixture of environmental and genetic factors. About two-thirds of cases run in families. Changing hormone levels may also play a role, as migraines affect slightly more boys than girls before puberty, but about two to three times more women than men. The risk of migraines usually decreases during pregnancy. The exact mechanisms of migraine are not known. It is, however, believed to be a neurovascular disorder. The primary theory is related to increased excitability of the cerebral cortex and abnormal control of pain neurons in the trigeminal nucleus of the brainstem.

Initial recommended management is with simple analgesics such as ibuprofen and paracetamol (also known as acetaminophen) for the headache, an antiemetic for the nausea, and the avoidance of triggers. Specific agents such as triptans or ergotamines may be used by those for whom simple analgesics are not effective. Globally, approximately 15% of the population is affected by migraines at some point in life.

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